Tag: Jason Nelson

A game of Praise regardless of how you play

For my assignment, I played with Nothing You Have Done Deserves Praise. The game involves you going through different levels, where you must move in different directions, or jump up or go down. As you do so, different phrases of praise appear and encouraging you to keep going further with the game. Surrounding the character and the screen was strange…

Puzzled Poetics: Jason Nelson Makes a Rubix Cube

The noise of a distorted power chord greeted me once I entered Jason Nelson’s “Birds Still Warm from Flying,” a sound that gave way to rhythmic tambourine accompanied by an occasional frog-like croak. Through this project, I experienced work that demonstrates Jason Nelson’s reputation for producing bizarre, unsettling pieces of digital literature, works that I’ve found to be original and…

Play, Oh Play

Jason Nelson’s “Uncontrollable Semantics” is a work of digital poetry in which 50 different environments incorporate minimal words, music/sound, and mouse-driven interface. It is a work of hypertext poetry in which the user chooses one of four words on the screen to move from page to page. At each page, the user will experience new words, new images, and new…

“Now Hug Yer Brain and Keep Playing:” Deciphering Jason Nelson

Playing Jason Nelson’s games/art creations felt like my brain was being assaulted. It is messy, often incoherent, and destabilizing in many ways. I read that chaos as a way of mimicking both the overwhelming amount of information that is accessible in the age of the internet and the overwhelming amount of “choices” we have as consumers in a capitalist society.…

A Postmodern Interpretation of Jason Nelson

This blog post promises to not be very coherent, but I’m going to attempt to throw some ideas out there about Jason Nelson’s work. First, everyone should know that Nelson, in spite of the initial “No, really, I think he’s on drugs” reaction we probably all had, is very prolific. His works go back for at least a decade (and…

Clearing the clouds, clouding the clear

For today’s class we all played Jason Nelson’s four part game series “Arctic Acre Oddities and Curious Lands.” In these games Nelson uses glitch aesthetic to overturn a lot of standard notions about how a video game should deliver meaning and how one should function. Instead of making anymore generalizations right now about all of the games I’ll take a…