Tag: elit376

Google Gives Birth to Poems

Our class’ definition of electronic literature as literary work that is born digital aptly describes Sampsa Nuotia and Raisa Omaheimo’s work “Google Poetics”. Their constantly growing collection of poems is an insightful, humorous, and sometimes saddening side effect of Google’s autocomplete feature.     While Sampsa Nuotia and Raisa Omaheimo are the archivers of the work it is impossible for…

Playing Google Maps

Geoguessr is an online game which was released nearly two years ago, on the thirteenth of May, 2013. This game was developed by a swedish information technology consultant, and has gained rapid popularity among the online populations. The game starts by placing the player in a randomized location in google street view. The player of the game is then tasked…

Death, and again: A Critical Analysis of J. Yellowlees Douglas’ “I Have Said Nothing”

Jane Yellowlees Douglas, or J. Yellowlees Douglas, is Director of the Center Written and Oral Communication and an assistant Professor of English at the University of Florida. She completed her undergrad studies at the University of Michigan and received her Ph.D from New York University. She has spent years researching the influence hypertext has had on the construction of digital…

Holding Your Hand A Bit Too Tightly: How Much Tutorial Is Enough?

One of the greatest aspects of electronic literature is that it’s very open to different interpretations. As an extension of this genre, it’s fair to add that games can be considered literature, generally through narration and/or an overarching plot. With games that aren’t laden with story or instruction, there is the notion that charm or effectiveness can be conveyed through the ability…

Gone Home: Storytelling in Short Bursts

Gone Home is a game made by the Fullbright Company or as steam calls it “short indie exploration walking simulator” since your only actions are to walk, turn on lights, and picking up and examining things, and that is pretty much all you need. It is about your character, Katie Greenbriar, returning home from her year in Europe. No one…

Who’s Side Are You On?

Strangely enough, “Airplay” by Barry Smylie is quite an interesting piece of electronic literature even though it barely utilizes words (unless it is explaining the directions). “Airplay” was published May 6, 2010, and is a series of games where the user is tasked by playing good and evil. The user does this by participating in competitions between God and the Devil.…

The Deletionist

While exploring N + 7, Lipogram, and other instant-deconstructionist devices, I came upon another tool for creating “instant e-literature.” There is an interesting tool called “the Deletionist” which automatically creates an erasure poem by “removing text to uncover poems.” You add it to your bookmarks tab, and whenever you are on a webpage where you wish to create an erasure…