Author: dylanlederleensign

Past and Future e-lit

I came across this article detailing the founding and early history of the Electronic Literature Organization, whose collections have been the source of many posts on this blog. The article is written by Scott Rettburg, a co-founder of the ELO and its first executive director. One of the things I found most interesting about his reflections on the early days, was…

Prom Week

Prom Week is recently released game from the UC Santa Cruz Expressive Intelligence Studio. It takes place in an over the top, stereotypical American highschool in the week before prom. The creators describe the game as a puzzle game based on “social physics”. Where typical physics puzzles might involve manipulating levers, weights, and momentum to move an object from point A to point…

Poking around in Passage

One of the first games we played in this class was Passage, by Jason Rohrer. In this post I’m going to take a look at the source code of the game as a paratext which can aid our interpretation of the work. This approach is heavily influenced by Critical Code Studies, from Mark Marino , and a continuation of work I did last…

Games are all about control

Of course that isn’t completely true, but many of the best art games I know of deal with the theme of control, typically at both the narrative and procedural level. In this post I’ll provide a few examples that try to back up this claim, and then try to figure out why this is true. The word “control” is fairly embedded…

Games are Complicated

In the latest edition of the journal Game Studies, Miguel Sicart wrote an intentionally provocative piece title “Against Procedurality”, which attempts to poke at the idea of procedural rhetoric and its centrality in current academic discourse about video games. This could be the first public shot in a new debate to split the game studies world again, just as ludology vs narratology…