The Red Room: Inkubus

“The Bedroom”

“Beccy’s conversation”

Inkubus is a first-person coming of age horror game. It was created in 2014 by DreamingMethods and shows the player a peak of what might actually be behind the computer screen. You start out as a grounded teenage girl in your bedroom.  The color scheme of the game is very ominous as almost everything is red and black. Strait ahead of the player at the beginning of the game is a red laptop sitting on the bed. Once you walk up to it a scene begins as you start talking to your friend Beccy through computer text.

A conversation ensues and the game gives you a variety of responses to give your friend Beccy and the choices you choose affect her responses to the player. Also, something else that’s very eerie about the game. The entire time you are having your text conversation you can see your characters face in the screen of the computer. After the first conversation, you can hear mumbling from the other room, presumably your mother. Beccy asks you what she wanted, again, giving you several responses. After this conversation begins, Beccy’s questions start to become more frank and off-pudding. Her questions are almost intimidating as she starts to ask strange questions regarding your character and who you want to be. This is where the “coming of age” factor starts to take place.

“Inside the internet”

Suddenly, your character disappears almost into a cloud. You end up inside the red laptop! This scenery of this is terrifying as everything is eerily black and red. The game gives you the option of flashing a bright light to scare off ads that might attack you. A message from Beccy pops up and tells you that you have to search for a portal to find your way out. So, you travel through the cringeworthy landscape avoiding ads and looking at posts about “celebs” and more messages from Beccy about “who you are” until eventually, you find several portals. Each portal leads out, but I think (not quite sure) that each portal symbolizes a route in the players life that she can take. Once you enter a portal, the game ends and you’re back in your room. Overall, for a short first-person horror game, on a literary analysis I feel like this game has a lot of depth. The use of text and underlying meaning within the game was used well and was able to clearly convey the message of “coming of age.”  

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